What is a Critical Incident?

by Dennis Potter Sunday, November 1, 2015
I explained to someone the other day the work we do at Crisis Care Network. We respond after Critical Incidents or trauma events to help employees “bounce back”. I was asked what kind of events we handle most frequently. I responded our three most common events are death of an employee, robbery, and staff size readjustments. Again, I was asked, did these deaths happen in the workplace? Are the robberies the type we see on TV and in the movies with guns brandished and shots fired?  No, I said, they are most often natural or accidental deaths outside the workplace, and the robberies rarely involve weapons shown or anyone actually hurt in the robbery. My friend said, these are not really trauma or crisis events, but rather are events that are disruptive in the workplace!

It was then a light bulb went off over my head (if I were a cartoon character). We talk, teach about, and promote Critical Incident Response (CIR) in the Workplace as responding to a trauma event. In fact, CIR are most frequently a highly disruptive event traumatic to the families of the victims, but are far more often disruptive to the normal flow of work in the workplace due to their sudden unexpected nature.

The most common themes employees have after these unexpected events has to do with grief and loss rather than traumatic stress reactions. Employees want to know their reactions are common, but more importantly they want to know what to do about them. They want to know what to say to the families of the deceased, or to their own loved ones after the event.

Maybe we should talk about Critical Incidents as things that are disruptive to the workplace and get away from using terms like crisis or trauma so people understand better the worthwhile work we do for employees to help the workplace recover.

Dennis Potter, LMSW, CAADC, ICCS, FAAETS, serves as Manager, Consultant Relations and Training for Crisis Care Network. He is a licensed social worker and certified addiction counselor. Dennis is recognized as a Fellow, by the American Academy of Experts in Traumatic Stress. He was awarded the ICISF Excellence in Training and Educations Award at the ICISF 2011 World Congress.


Tags:

Self-Awareness | Sexual Trauma | Social Work | Suicide Bereavement | Suicide Prevention | Therapeutic Relationship | Therapy | Trauma

Healing After Sexual Trauma

by Gilbert Bliss Friday, July 4, 2014

I have had the privilege of working with patients who have had sexual trauma early in their lives, either as children or young adults.  As a result of this opportunity, I have come to believe that it can be important for some who have experienced such a terrible experience, either once or over time, to work with a therapist of the same gender as the abuser.  While I do not, in any way, believe that anyone should seek the advice of a therapist with whom they would experience immediate discomfort, I am of the deep conviction that a healing relationship with a therapist of the same gender as the abuser could help to lift the limitations a patient might feel with regard to letting themselves be available for a meaningful relationship with another person.

Such a venture is a very tender process, involving time and an openness of expression that could help a patient be liberated of old fears while becoming wise about how to best take care of themselves in situations that, after working through the trauma, might otherwise make them too anxious to allow involvement.  This is the process of moving from the position of victim to permission to thrive, perhaps on an even higher level than even the patient might have allowed themselves to consider.

As with any patient I see, my approach is collaborative.  If a patient is too uncomfortable with the work we are doing, I change my approach to take their feelings into account.  If the work just feels like it is "too much", we take a break.  No one should feel like a prisoner to the therapeutic endeavor.

I invite people who have had such difficult experiences to consider what, to some of my colleagues, seems a radical approach.  I would hope that the discovery would be that there is nothing to lose but some time.

Gil Bliss is a Licensed Certified Social Worker-Clinical (LCSW-C) with a private psychotherapy practice in Towson, Maryland.  Gil has worked with a wide variety of patients, including individuals, couples and families, along with grief work with children.  His web site is www.gblisscounselor.com.

Tags:

Abuse | Anxiety | Couples | Healing | Intimacy | marriage | Marriage and Family Therapy | Mental Health | relationships, friendships | Sexual | Sexual Trauma | Therapeutic Relationship | Therapy | Trauma | Treatment Modalities

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