I have Cancer. How do I find a therapist to help me and my family?

by Charli Prather Monday, February 15, 2016


I have Cancer. How do I find a therapist to help me and my family with the social and emotional challenges we face? Here are some questions to ask:


• Have you had training in oncology (the last thing you need right now is to provide your therapist translation services)? 
• Have you worked, volunteered, or interned in a hospital or oncology center?

• Have you had a personal experience with cancer? If you are a survivor, how long have you been out of treatment? A healthy time frame of recovery is important.

• Have you worked with clients experiencing "chemo brain"? Do you have a complete understanding of "cure vs. remission" and the specific needs of a cancer patient/survivor?

• Are you available to visit me in the hospital, at home, or provide phone or closed circuit video sessions if I’m not up to coming into the office? What are the charges are related to this type of care? 
• What is your “late cancel” policy?  I may experience treatment side effects that come on unexpectedly.

• Are you willing to assist me finding resources regarding my employment, co-pays for expensive drugs, financial planning, how to talk to my kids, my boss, etc. 

• Will you be able to provide sessions that may involve family members who don’t understand the complexity of my prognosis if it changes? 
• For those with advanced cancers: Are you comfortable providing me end of life care if my condition worsens?   
• Are you familiar with MBCR?  Mindfulness Based Cancer Recovery techniques?  


Charli Prather-Levinson, MSW LCSW EAP-C RYT is a former Board Certified Oncology Social Worker and 2 time cancer survivor. She works part time in private practice and works for the Cancer Support Community Headquarter’s offices part time as a Cancer Helpline Counselor.  Charli has over 20 years combined experience as a hospice therapist and as Clinical Program Director of the St. Louis Cancer Support Community affiliate. Charli also advises clients on healthy lifestyle changes that can ‘STACK THE DECK’ against emotional and physical disease. Charli also holds certifications as a Food for Life™ Plant Based Nutrition Educator and Warriors at Ease® Meditation & Yoga Teacher for those in need of a modified yoga practice due to physical limitations. Charli spends her free time traveling the country with the Wounded Warrior Project serving as a contract therapist and yoga & meditation instructor. 






 

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Advise | Anxiety | Healing | Intimacy | Mental Health | Social Work | Stress | Therapeutic Relationship | Therapy | Video Therapy | Wisdom

The Drawbacks of Online Scheduling

by Sherry Katz Tuesday, June 30, 2015

The obvious value of online scheduling is efficiency and convenience.  Therapist and patient do not need to talk with each other to schedule their appointments.

Since our entire method of professionally offering service relies on talking to people, what, if any, areas of our work are affected by utilizing online appointment scheduling? 

The initial phone contact from the patient was once referred to as an “intake”.  

This was a chance for the therapist to assess an overview of the case and whether they or their agency, would be able to handle the level of care required.

This was also a way for a prospective patient to get a firsthand feel of working with either the particular therapist or the overall view of how the agency would address their matter.

The question for therapists to consider is whether the demographic and “check the box” information of online scheduling, is an equal substitute for a phone assessment intake.

Maybe in fact the first in person session has become the former phone intake. 

Only now we have a hopeful new patient sitting in front of us who may not be a good fit for the type of therapy work we do.

What if, when scheduling an initial appointment, instead of prioritizing time efficiency and convenience only, we limit our online scheduling gadgets to situations which do not actively require our professional skills?

Sherry Katz, LCSW is clinically trained in systems relational therapy, and practices marriage and family therapy in her solo practice located in Ridgewood, NJ.  Comments and questions are welcome www.newviewsfamilytherapy.com.

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Advise | Anxiety | Mental Health | Self-Awareness | Social Work | Stress | Therapeutic Relationship | Therapy | Video Therapy | Wisdom

Video Sessions Improve Therapy

by Buck Black Thursday, December 11, 2014

In this age of connectivity, clients expect therapy to be accessible. I continue to see unmet demand for video therapy. Few therapists offer this service which I started doing a few years ago. My clients benefit from video therapy in many ways. I have clients traveling who want to keep their appointments.  I use video to meet with college students who return home for the summer and breaks. I use video to meet with clients during snow days, transportation problems, forgotten appointments (just log-on for a session so the appointment time can still be used) and for those whose illness was contagious, yet they needed their session because they felt so bad, both mentally and physically. I also have business people who want their session, but cannot afford the travel time on account of their busy schedule.

It is difficult for rural residents to get services.  Video sessions make this easier.  Rural clients, however, often do not have a fast enough internet connection, but this will improve in time.  Some rural clients have a high quality cell signal, which allows them to hold a session, but this cuts into their data allotment. I have had success relying on a phone call for the audio and tolerating a lower quality video feed.

In my experience offering the option for video sessions helps me give my clients a higher level of care and means my clients are more likely to keep their appointments. If the client is comfortable with the technology, it works well. If their internet connection goes out, then the phone is a backup. There are many clients not comfortable with video sessions and choose to only come to the office. This is OK too. Over time I believe more people will be comfortable with video sessions. 

There are some situations where video sessions are not appropriate. Examples include clients who pose a high risk, such as homicidal and/or suicidal ideation, psychosis, or who simply need a more intense services.  I never use video sessions with someone who is court ordered or having problems with denial. I don’t feel video sessions are powerful enough in this situation.  However, if someone is looking to better themselves and is higher functioning, video sessions are often ideal.

Remember, it is important for both therapist and client to have a history of using video conferencing services and have quality internet, a high quality router and computer, and good lighting. We need to ensure the technology adds to the therapy experience.

Therapy must embrace technology to remain relevant and to help clients.  If licensed therapists do not embrace video therapy, those in need of therapy will seek less qualified people who are using video services.  Lets not let our profession be left behind.

Buck Black LCSW, CST is a therapist who has several years of experience using video conferencing with clients to address anger, stress, and relationship issues.  Therapy appointments are also available at his office. His information is at www.BuckBlack.com Follow him on twitter @BuckBlack

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